List of Subjects

Click on the appropriate link below to know more about the subject:

 

Additional Mathematics

This Additional Mathematics course provides a variety of topics with related attributes which would enable Caribbean students to reason logically using the prior knowledge gained from the CSEC General Proficiency Mathematics. Candidates are expected to enter this course of study with a solid foundation of algebraic knowledge and mathematical reasoning.

On completing this course students will be able to make a smooth transition to higher levels of study in Mathematics, or move on to career choices where a deeper knowledge of the general concepts of Mathematics is required. This course of study, which includes fundamentals of Pure and Applied Mathematics, caters to diverse interests enabling students to develop critical-thinking skills applicable to other subject areas.

Some of the underlying concepts of Mathematics will be explored to a level which fosters a deeper understanding and greater appreciation of Mathematics. This will give students the confidence and ability to approach problem-solving in enlightened ways and lead to creative methods of solving complex real-world problems.  

This course thus provides insight into the exciting world of advanced mathematics, thereby equipping students with the tools necessary to approach any mathematical situation with confidence.

The syllabus is arranged as a set of topics, and each topic is defined by its specific objectives and content.  The topics are arranged in four sections as follows:

Section 1    -    Algebra and Functions

Section 2    -    Coordinate Geometry and Trigonometry

Section 3    -    Introductory Calculus

Section 4    -    Basic Mathematical Applications

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Agricultural Science

The Agricultural Science Syllabus is designed to allow students to develop knowledge and understanding of the interaction between the component parts of agriculture and the scientific principles that explain the processes that take place when inputs are transformed into outputs. The syllabus requires students to treat with certain conceptual and theoretical issues associated with the discipline, while at the same time providing them with the opportunity to develop a wide range of practical skills and an awareness of the technologies associated with agriculture. 

The syllabus provides for study leading to a Single Award or a Double Award in the subject and is arranged in five sections:

Section A         -           The Business of Farming

Section B         -           Crop Production

Section C         -           Animal Production

Section D         -           Horticulture

Section E         -           Animal Management

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Biology

Biology explores the levels of organization of life, from the molecular level, through cellular to higher levels.  It includes developing an understanding of the interactions within and between organisms and between organisms and their environment. The study of biology recognizes, however, that humans have a greater influence on the environment than other species. The study of biology, therefore, is designed to assist students to recognize their responsibility to conserve, protect, maintain and improve the quality of the biological environment for future generations.

The Biology Syllabus is designed to allow students to work individually and with others in practical, field and interactive activities that are related to theoretical concepts in the course. It is expected that students will apply investigative and problem-solving skills, effectively communicate scientific information and appreciate the contribution that a study of biology makes to their understanding of the world. The syllabus will assist students to develop positive values and attitudes towards the living components of the environment and will also provide a sound foundation for those who wish to pursue further studies in the sciences.

The syllabus is arranged in five sections as follows:

Section A    -    Organisms in the Environment
Section B    -    Life Processes
Section C    -    Continuity and Variation
Section D    -    Disease and its Impact on Humans
Section E    -    The Environment and Human Activities

 

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Caribbean History

This syllabus has been guided by a particular view of the nature of history as a discipline, the educational needs of students, and the desire to promote the development of an ideal Caribbean person.

There is no attempt in this syllabus to promote one organising principle or interpretation of Caribbean History.  While a thematic arrangement has been imposed on the course of Caribbean History, the content within each theme has been stated in such a way as to permit exploration of a variety of organising principles.  Nevertheless, the selection of themes and their content has been informed by a desire to promote a distinctly Caribbean perspective.   This perspective acknowledges the need for a respect of human life and a cultural heritage that values harmony and cherishes diversity as a strength.

The thematic approach has been adopted because it lends itself to detailed treatment of the type that allows the student to practise the various skills of the historian.  However, by grouping themes and by requiring students to study an overview, a core of topics, the syllabus seeks to maintain chronology as an important aspect of the study of history.

The syllabus consists of a Core and nine Themes.  The Themes are arranged in Sections A to C.  Students are required to study the Core and to study in detail one Theme from each of the three Sections (A, B, C).

Section                    Theme

      A             1.    The Indigenous Peoples and the Europeans
                     2.     Caribbean Economy and Slavery
                     3.     Resistance and Revolt

     B             4.    Metropolitan Movements towards Emancipation
                     5.    Adjustments to Emancipation, 1838 - 1876     
                     6.    Caribbean Economy, 1875 - 1985
           
     C             7.    The United States in the Caribbean, 1776 - 1985
                     8.    Caribbean Political Development up to 1985
                     9.    Caribbean Society 1900 - 1985
 

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Chemistry

Chemistry is concerned with the physical and chemical properties of substances and the interaction of energy and matter. Principles of Chemistry are applied to the search for solutions to societal concerns and problems, including the depletion of known sources of energy, the extinction of some species through environmental pollution and the struggles of humans to create the conditions for sustainable development.

The study of Chemistry involves an investigation into chemical reactions and processes. The discipline attempts to explain and predict events at the atomic and molecular level. The study of chemistry, therefore, provides students with an understanding of the nature of matter and the behaviour of substances.  
 
The Chemistry Syllabus is designed to allow students to work individually and with others in practical, field and interactive activities that are related to theoretical concepts in the course. It is expected that students will apply investigative and problem-solving skills, effectively communicate scientific information and appreciate the contribution that a study of chemistry makes to their understanding of the world. The syllabus will assist students to develop positive values and attitudes towards the environment and will also provide a sound foundation for those who wish to pursue further studies in the sciences.

The syllabus is divided into three sections:

        Section A    -    Principles of Chemistry

        Section B    -    Descriptive Chemistry

                    1.    Organic Chemistry
                    2.    Inorganic Chemistry

        Section C    -    Chemistry in the Home

 

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Economics

The Economics Syllabus introduces students to relevant economic concepts and principles that will provide the foundation necessary for a proper understanding of how economies work, especially the economies of small states like those in the Caribbean. It also gives students the critical knowledge and skills to communicate ideas using the language and tools of the discipline of Economics.
 
The Economics Syllabus provides a useful foundation not only for further study in Economics but also for study in other Social Science subjects, including History, Politics, Business and International  Relations.
 
In summary, the syllabus seeks to equip students with the basic tools necessary for an understanding and interpretation of economic phenomena experienced by Caribbean people and for communicating, intelligently and effectively, on economic issues in the region and the wider international community.

The syllabus is arranged in seven sections, sub-divided into specific objectives and corresponding content.

The Economics Syllabus introduces students to relevant economic concepts and principles that will provide the foundation necessary for a proper understanding of how economies work, especially the economies of small states like those in the Caribbean. It also gives students the critical knowledge and skills to communicate ideas using the language and tools of the discipline of Economics.
 
The Economics Syllabus provides a useful foundation not only for further study in Economics but also for study in other Social Science subjects, including History, Politics, Business and International  Relations.
 
In summary, the syllabus seeks to equip students with the basic tools necessary for an understanding and interpretation of economic phenomena experienced by Caribbean people and for communicating, intelligently and effectively, on economic issues in the region and the wider international community.

The syllabus is arranged in seven sections, sub-divided into specific objectives and corresponding content.

Section 1    -    The Nature of Economics
Section 2    -    Production, Economic Resources and Resource Allocation
Section 3    -    Markets and Prices
Section 4    -    The Financial Sector
Section 5    -    Economic Management: Policies and Goals
Section 6    -     International Trade
Section 7    -    Caribbean Economies in a Global Environment

 

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Electronic Document Preparation and Management (EDPM)

The ability to use the computer provides essential skills for prospective business employees in the fields of data management and document preparation. Students seeking opportunities in the world of work or opportunities for further studies must develop competence and proficiency in the production of documents of the quality and standard required for the world of business.

The Electronic Document Preparation and Management syllabus is designed to equip students with the pre-requisite knowledge and technological skills required to solve problems related to the preparation, presentation and management of electronic documents.  

The knowledge and skills gained from the syllabus will foster students’ personal growth and development, enhance their problem-solving and decision-making capabilities and contribute towards the production of a disciplined and ethical workforce.

The syllabus is arranged in nine modules, sub-divided into specific objectives and corresponding content.

Module I         -    Keyboarding Mastery
Module II        -    File Management
Module III       -    Selection and Use of Stationery
Module IV       -    Production - Principles
Module V        -    Business Correspondence
Module VI       -    Production - Display
Module VII      -    Production - Tabulations and Presentations
Module VIII     -    Production - Forms
Module IX       -    Planning and Organisation

The syllabus replaces CSEC Typewriting and uses the computer instead of the typewriter.  Unlike the CSEC Information Technology Syllabus, CSEC EDPM emphasises computer applications related to the production, filing and retrieval of documents, skills that are crucial in today’s office environment.

 

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English

Students explore receptively and expressively three major literary modes, Drama, Poetry, and Prose Fiction, in order to become aware of the many functions and purposes of language.  In doing so, they discover that the four facets of language arts, namely, listening, speaking, reading and writing, are closely linked together and are interdependent.

Syllabus objectives are organised under understanding and expression in order to guide curriculum development, to give meaning to a teaching programme and to define an assessment scheme that reinforces an English syllabus which has been conceived as an integrated approach to language teaching and which enables students to appreciate the holistic nature of language learning.

The English Syllabus is organised for examination as English A and English B.  The former emphasises the development of oral and written language skills among students through a variety of strategies.  The latter provides opportunities for students to explore and respond critically to specific literary texts as they observe and appreciate the author’s craft.

 

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Geography

Geography is concerned with spatial expression, human and natural systems and the interrelationships between them.  It facilitates an understanding of both the issues emerging from human exploitation of natural resources and how natural resources may be managed to assure sustainability.  It contributes to an awareness and understanding of the natural environment and fosters an appreciation of its sustainability.  It also encourages the development of a sense of responsibility in using and conserving the natural resources of the planet.

Spatial expression and map reading skills are essential to a study of the subject.  These skills enable an individual to operate better in space by being able to establish a location and an orientation whether inside a town or a rural area, or on a mountainside and to be able to read the landscape as well as assess the forces which have shaped them.  

The study of Geography, therefore, prepares an individual not only for a career in fields such as environment planning and management, international relations and geographical information systems, but also helps to develop skills that contribute to more meaningful and enjoyable travel and related leisure activities.

The Geography Syllabus, though not limited to a study of the Caribbean, focuses on areas of study that are particularly relevant to Caribbean students.  The syllabus utilizes Field Studies to concretize the link between the subject matter of Geography and the methods of investigation associated with it.  Students have an opportunity to observe, experience, reflect on, and draw conclusions about the intricate inter-dependence and inter-relationships that comprise the human and natural systems.  

The syllabus is organised under four main sections, namely, Map Reading and Field Study; Natural Systems; Human Systems and Human-Environment Systems.

 

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Home Economics Management

Home Economics makes a contribution to the whole curriculum when it is viewed as a design for successful living, personal development, technical expertise and career opportunities for both boys and girls. Home Economics also provides the opportunity to utilise modern technology for developing the skills and capabilities necessary for meeting the demands in the world of work.  Home Economics can produce well rounded, informed citizens.

Home Economics is offered for examination in three disciplines, namely, Home Economics: Management, Clothing and Textiles and Food and Nutrition. The disciplines offered articulate with tertiary level education programmes, which allow students to acquire skills for advanced learning and for industry and business.

The syllabus for Home Economics: Management is designed to enable students to develop knowledge, attitudes and skills to manage available resources to attain family goals.  The course of study is intended to provide students with a range of management capabilities, including problem-solving, decision-making, management and practical skills to assist them in leading more effective lives, as individuals and as members of a community.

The syllabus for Clothing and Textiles is designed to enable candidates to make intelligent decisions about the choice and importance of clothing and other sewn products, to acquire skills that enable them to produce these products and to utilize the acquired skills for employment and leisure.

The syllabus for Food and Nutrition is intended to provide opportunities for the development of skills in the planning, preparation and presentation of foods.  This is a basic requirement for health and well being.  In addition, the course provides an understanding of the nature of food and the principles of nutrition.

 

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Human and Social Biology

Human and Social Biology is concerned with the study of the structure and functioning of the human body. It also involves the application of biological principles, knowledge and skills, and technological advances, to the maintenance of health and to solve the problems of living together. The subject incorporates the view that human beings have a responsibility to their environment and, as such, have an obligation to conserve, protect, maintain and improve its quality.

The CSEC Human and Social Biology syllabus is designed to allow students to work individually and cooperatively, utilizing theoretical concepts of the course in interactive and practical activities.  Students are expected to apply investigative and problem-solving skills, be effective in communicating scientific knowledge and demonstrate an appreciation for all living organisms in their environment.

The CSEC syllabus in Human and Social Biology provides Caribbean students with a foundation for further study in fields where an understanding of the structure and functioning of the human body and the application of biological principles to the maintenance of health have relevance.  It also helps to provide students with knowledge, skills and attitudes that are important for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The syllabus is organised under five main sections:

i.    Living organisms and the environment.

ii.    Life processes.

iii.    Heredity and variation.

iv.    Disease and its impact on humans.

v.    The impact of health practices on the environment.

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Industrial Technology

The Industrial Technology Syllabuses aim at providing technical training in the use of both traditional and new materials, systems and processes related to industry. The Industrial Technology syllabuses are organized in Units namely:

UNIT 1:  Electrical and Electronic Technology
UNIT 2:  Mechanical Engineering Technology
UNIT 3:  Building Technology ( (i) Woods, (ii) Construction)

 Each Unit provides a relevant course of study for secondary school students aspiring to careers related to the Electrical and Electronic, Mechanical Engineering or Building Technology area, and in so doing responds to the need to provide persons with entry level skills for the various fields.

Each Unit is designed to be covered in the final two years of the full secondary school programme and students are allowed to select one or more Units for study, but only one option (Construction or Woods) in Building Technology. Safety, Health and Welfare, Introduction to Computer and Career Opportunities are compulsory modules for all three Units.

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Information Technology

This syllabus is designed to provide a coherent view of the significance of information in a socio-economic context.  Emphasis is placed on application of knowledge, problem-solving using the computer, and proficiency in using productivity tools. This approach has been adopted in recognition of the impact that changes in the availability of information can have on the educational process.  Focus is placed on getting students to develop skills for life in an increasingly technological world, rather than on students absorbing a myriad of seemingly unrelated facts which may have only short term relevance.

The syllabus aims to expose candidates to a wide range of Information and Communication Technologies, affording learning experiences which include an element of discovery, and foster self-confidence.  Candidates would also acquire computer-related practical skills that will prepare them to meet the region’s need for increased productivity and efficiency in a fast changing technological world.  The syllabus has been organized to offer certification at the General Proficiency only.  

The syllabus is organised under eight main sections.
                              
1.    Fundamentals of Hardware and Software
2.    Problem-Solving and Program Design    
3.    Program Implementation                            
4.    Applications and Implications of Information and Communications Technology
5.    Information Processing
6.    Wordprocessing, Presentation and Web Page Design
7.    Spreadsheets
8.    Database Management

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Integrated Science

The syllabus is based on three themes – The Organism and Its Environment, The Home and Workplace, and Energy – chosen because, they adequately reflect the common areas of human activity and experience.   These themes form the unifying points of the syllabus which should, therefore, be seen as a coherent unit.   Integrated Science is a subject in its own right, encompassing topics mainly from Physics, Chemistry and Biology.   Indeed, if such distinctions were made, other components such as Earth Sciences and Meteorology would also be recognized.

The CSEC Integrated Science syllabus is designed to allow students to work individually and cooperatively, utilizing theoretical concepts of the course in interactive and practical activities.   Students are expected to apply, scientific principles, investigative and problem solving skills, be effective in communicating scientific knowledge and demonstrate an appreciation for all living organisms in their environment.

The Integrated Science syllabus is intended to contribute to the science education needs of Caribbean secondary level students in the following groups:

i.    those whose abilities, aptitudes and choice of courses will allow them to pursue only one science subject, or who wish to pursue a science course in the interest of a rounded general   education;

ii.    those who study science-related subjects such as Home Economics, Physical Education and Sport and Agricultural Science, or who intend to go on to studies at the tertiary level, for careers in areas, such as, nursing and teaching.

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Mathematics

The guiding principles of the Mathematics Syllabus direct that Mathematics as taught in Caribbean schools should be relevant to the existing and anticipated needs of Caribbean society, related to the abilities and interests of Caribbean students and aligned with the philosophy of the educational system.  These principles focus attention on the use of Mathematics as a problem solving tool, as well as on some of the fundamental concepts which help to unify Mathematics as a body of knowledge.  The syllabus explains general and unifying concepts that facilitate the study of Mathematics as a coherent subject rather than as a set of unrelated topics.

Every citizen needs basic computational skills (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) and the ability to use these mentally to solve everyday problems.  All citizens should recognize the importance of accuracy in computation as the foundation for deductions and decisions based on the results.  In addition, the citizen should have, where possible, a choice of mathematical techniques to be applied in a variety of situations.  A ‘range of mathematical techniques’ is therefore, specified in recognition of the need to accommodate different levels of ability. Citizens need to use Mathematics in many forms of decision-making: shopping, paying bills, budgeting and for the achievement of personal goals: critically evaluating advertisements, taxation, investing, commercial activities, banking, working with and using current technologies, measurements and understanding data in the media.  Improving efficiency and skills in these matters will be beneficial to the community as well as to the individual.

The syllabus seeks to provide for the needs of specific mathematical techniques in the future careers of students, for example, in agriculture and in commercial and technical fields. By the end of the normal secondary school course, students should appreciate that the various branches of Mathematics are not rigidly segregated and that the approach to the solution of any problem is not necessarily unique.

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Modern Languages

The Modern Languages Syllabus focuses on developing students’ ability to communicate in two of the languages in use in the Caribbean region. As students develop the competence to listen, speak, read and write in French and Spanish and interpret aspects of the culture in which the languages are embedded, they acquire the means to facilitate deeper interaction with our Caribbean neighbours. The topics selected for the syllabus reflect areas of interest to secondary school students. Language learning, therefore, provides an opportunity for students to compare their own experiences with those of their peers in Francophone and Hispanic Caribbean countries.

Music

In offering the CSEC Music syllabus, the Caribbean Examinations Council is providing opportunities for the development of a practical knowledge of music and of the skills of analysis that can form the basis for further studies in teaching, performing, conducting, composing and arranging, the music business and other music-related fields.  The syllabus is rooted in Caribbean musical expressions, as well as in the musical expressions of other cultures. Further, the syllabus enables regional peoples to participate in the continuing development of Caribbean musical culture and to contribute to, and draw from, the pool of knowledge that constitutes world music.

The Music syllabus focuses on three major topics or profile dimensions namely:

1.    Listening and Appraising (LIAP)
2.    Performing (PERF)
3.    Composing.(COMP)

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Office Administration

Office Administration is a Business Education subject concerned with the study of administrative principles, policies, procedures and technological competencies governing the modern office environment.  The content and teaching strategies used reflect current trends in the modern office.  The syllabus aims to provide students with knowledge, skills and attitudes for immediate access to entry-level positions such as administrative assistants, clerical assistants, receptionists, record management clerks, accounting clerks and factory and dispatch clerks and other related positions.

The syllabus adopts a practical approach, aimed at equipping students with the technical and professional skills to perform effectively, and for mobility as administrative support personnel within an organization.   Further, it seeks to nurture and improve students’ social and personal management skills and foster the development of a positive work ethic.  In addition, the syllabus provides the foundation for students desirous of furthering their education in other related fields.

The syllabus is arranged in 12 modules, sub-divided into specific objectives and corresponding content.   

Module I     -    Office Orientation
Module II    -    Communication                    
Module III   -    Records and Information Management    
Module IV   -    Reception and Hospitality             
Module V    -    Meetings                    
Module VI   -    Travel Arrangements                
Module VII  -    Human Resources            
Module VIII -    The Accounts Office
Module IX   -    Purchasing and Stock Control        
Module X    -    Sales and Marketing                
Module XI   -    The Factory, Dispatch and Transport Offices    
Module XII  -    Recruitment and Orientation

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Physical Education and Sport

The Council, in offering the syllabus, is providing opportunities for the attainment of a working knowledge of Physical Education and Sport and its component parts.  Such knowledge can form the basis for further studies in Physical Education and related fields in health and sport.  The Physical Education and Sport Syllabus takes into consideration the multicultural nature of the Caribbean people and consequently, endeavours to respond to a wide range of Physical Education and Sport experiences. The syllabus comprises a Compulsory Core and three Options that are to be completed during the two-year course of study.  Each candidate must complete the Compulsory Core, ONE sport from each of the three sports from at least two different options.  

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Physics

Physics is concerned with systems, laws, models, principles and theories that explain the physical behaviour of the universe. Physics is regarded as a fundamental scientific discipline since all advances in technology can be traced, either directly or indirectly, to these fundamental physical laws and theories. The study of Physics provides students with knowledge and understanding of how the principles of Physics are applied to the development and production of machines and devices that contribute to the technological advance of societies.

The Physics Syllabus is designed to allow students to work individually and with others in practical, field and interactive activities that are related to theoretical concepts in the course. It is expected that students will apply investigative and problem-solving skills, effectively communicate scientific information and appreciate the contribution that a study of physics makes to their understanding of the world. The syllabus will assist students to develop positive values and attitudes towards the physical components of the environment and will also provide a sound foundation for those who wish to pursue further studies in the sciences.

The syllabus is arranged in six sections, namely:

        A.    Physical Measurements and Units
        B.    Mechanics
        C.    Thermal Physics and Kinetic Theory
        D.    Waves and Light    
        E.    Electricity and Magnetism
F.     The Physics of the Atom

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Principles of Accounts

Principles of Accounts is a course of study that provides an introduction to the principles and techniques that accountants employ in measuring, processing, evaluating and communicating information about the financial performance and position of a business.

The course in Principles of Accounts helps students to develop an understanding of a range of theoretical and practical techniques used in accounting.  It helps to develop skills that should enable them to participate more effectively and responsibly in today’s business environment, to improve the management of personal financial activities, such as, budgeting, savings and investment.  In addition, this course prepares students for post-secondary and professional studies in accounting.

The syllabus is arranged in 14 sections consisting of specific objectives and related content.

Section 1    -    Introduction to Principles of Accounts
Section 2    -    The Classified Balance Sheet
Section 3    -    Books of Original Entry
Section 4    -    Ledgers and the Trial Balance
Section 5    -    The Preparation and Analysis of Financial Statements of the Sole-trader
Section 6    -    End of Period Adjustments
Section 7    -    Control Systems
Section 8    -    Incomplete Records
Section 9    -    Accounting for Partnerships
Section 10  -    Accounting for Corporations (Limited Liability Companies)
Section 11  -    Accounting for Co-operative Societies
Section 12  -    Accounting for Non-Trading (Non Profit) Organizations
Section 13  -    Manufacturing Accounts
Section 14  -    Payroll Accounting

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Principles of Business

Principles of Business focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of business activities. It provides a framework to assist in more informed decision-making by individuals in their role of producers or consumers.

An understanding of business principles in this course of study prepares students to become productive members of society. The syllabus provides opportunity for students to develop entrepreneurial and managerial skills necessary to survive and prosper in a local, regional and global dynamic business environment.

The Principles of Business Syllabus engages students in conducting research which helps to improve their communication and critical thinking skills and creates an awareness of business ethics and social responsibilities.

The syllabus is arranged in into 10 sections consisting of specific objectives and related content.

Profile Dimension 1 - Organizational Principles
Section 1    -    The Nature of Business
Section 2    -    Internal Organizational Environment
Section 3    -    Establishing a Business
Section 4    -    Legal Aspects of Business

Profile Dimension 2 – Production, Marketing and Finance
Section 5    -    Production
Section 6    -    Marketing
Section 7    -    Business Finance

Profile Dimension 3 - The Business Environment
Section 8    -    Role of Government in an Economy
Section 9    -    Social Accounting and Global Trade
Section 10    -    Regional and Global Business Environment

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Religious Education

The Religious Education Syllabus is designed to provide students with opportunities to participate in the age-long search of human beings for the meaning and purpose of life, and to facilitate an appreciation and an affirmation of their own sense of uniqueness and identity. It is intended to assist them in understanding the concept of god in religions.  It also seeks to help them become aware of the interconnectedness among God, human beings and the world. The syllabus exposes students to different religious ideas, values and ways of expressing them so that they can interact meaningfully with people of different religious and cultural persuasions in the Caribbean and the world.

Further, the syllabus seeks to foster understanding, appreciation and respect for the religious, ethnic, cultural, political and other aspects of plurality in the Caribbean.  It is intended that the study of the Religious Education Syllabus will help students to understand their society and the belief systems of others, clarify their own belief systems, deal with problems, and resolve conflicts.

The Religious Education syllabus is made up of a Compulsory Core and four Options.  Each candidate must study the Compulsory Core and ONE Option.  The Core emphasizses the beliefs and practices of four world religions and six indigenous religions in the Caribbean.  This section is intended to provide a foundation for the study of the central concepts of the religions that will follow in the four Options listed below:

        Option    A    -    CHRISTIANITY
        Option    B    -    HINDUISM
        Option    C    -    ISLAM
        Option    D    -    JUDAISM

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Social Studies

Social Studies contributes to the effective development of the learner by increasing personal and social awareness, and by placing emphasis on values as well as on social and interpersonal relationships. This syllabus seeks to ensure that students develop the necessary skills and at the same time introduces them to knowledge of social phenomena that may enhance their effectiveness as social participants in the Caribbean community.  It is also intended that, through the syllabus, the process of valuing would be made conscious so that persons become aware of their position, thus enabling them to bring conscious criteria to bear on their choices as social participants.

Although the main focus of the syllabus is the Caribbean, opportunities have been provided for the treatment of international issues which have a bearing on Caribbean development.

The syllabus content is organised into three major sections.  Students are required to complete Sections A and B and one Option from Section C.

 
 

 

            Section A         -           Individual, Family and Society

Section B         -           Sustainable Development and Use of Resources

(i)   Development and Use of Resources

(ii)  Regional Integration

Section C         -           Options

C1        -           Communication

C2        -           Consumer Affairs

C3        -           Tourism

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Technical Drawing

The Technical Drawing course is an integral component of the Technical/Vocational Education (TVET) programme offered by the Council.  The syllabus is examined for certification at the General Proficiency and candidates have the option of using either the Traditional Drawing Method (drawing board and tee square) or Computer-Aided Drafting method/applications to complete the objectives of the syllabus.  

The syllabus is divided into three Units, namely,

1. Plane and Solid Geometry
2. Building Drawing
3. Mechanical Engineering Drawing.  

Candidates are required to complete the Unit on ‘Plane and Solid Geometry’ and select either the Unit on Building Drawing or the Unit on Mechanical Engineering Drawing. School candidates should be encouraged to include the following subjects in their programme of study:  
one of the Industrial Technology subjects ( Electrical and Electronic Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology and Building Technology), English A. Mathematics and Physics.

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Theatre Arts

The Theatre Arts syllabus is organised to be taught and experienced under three main principles: Appreciating and Analysing; Creating and Performing through Dance; Drama and Stage Crafts.  As such, Theatre Arts should not be conceived of as three distinct disciplines.  Rather, the Theatre Arts Syllabus has been designed to provide experiences that enable students to appreciate, create and communicate theatrical events with their minds as well as their senses, emotions and their bodies, thereby fostering self-confidence, self-discipline and self-motivation.   Students who complete a course in Theatre Arts will find that it has contributed significantly to their personal development.  It will also make them aware of the close relationships of theatre to such areas as the humanities, literature, composition, and oral communication.

The syllabus is made up of a Compulsory Core, three options or main areas of study and two projects that are to be completed during year two of the programme.  Each candidate must select the Compulsory Core, ONE of the three options or main areas and the TWO Projects.

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Visual Arts

In the Caribbean, much knowledge and information are communicated through images and spectacle and the visual arts serve to interpret this information and build bridges to understanding the role of art in interpreting our contemporary, historical, cultural and visual world.  The Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) syllabus in the Visual Arts will help to promote and encourage tolerance and diversity among students of different ethnic backgrounds, cultures and points of view in the region. The syllabus also helps students to develop intellectually and seeks to refine their critical thinking skills and judgments through research and the making of art.

The knowledge, understanding, skills and values to be gained from the CSEC Visual Arts Syllabus are organized in three components namely:

1.    Two-Dimensional Expressive Forms          -         Drawing, Painting and Mixed- media, Graphic and Communication Design, Printmaking, Textile Design and Manipulation

2.    Three-Dimensional Expressive Forms       -         Sculpture and Ceramics  Leathercraft, Fibre and Decorative Arts

3.    The Reflective Journal                                    -         The Theory, Process and Practice of Visual Arts                 

 These components assist students in building conceptual and practical skills which can be applied in art, craft, design and related careers in the world of work.   

The CSEC Visual Arts Syllabus provides students with a basis for further study, enhances leisure time pursuits and fosters their aesthetic, physical, spiritual, personal and cultural development.  The syllabus also focuses on the Caribbean, since there is a pressing need for the people of the region to develop an aesthetic awareness and appreciation of their cultural heritage.

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